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Recy Taylor, Catalyst for Anti-Rape Activism in the Jim Crow South, Dead at 97 | The Root

Recy Taylor, Catalyst for Anti-Rape Activism in the Jim Crow South, Dead at 97 | The Root Recy Taylor, whose story of sexual assault at the hands of six white men in 1944 is featured in the book At the Dark End of the Street: Black Women, Rape, and Resistance—A New History of the Civil Rights Movement From Rosa Parks to the Rise of Black Power, died at a nursing home in Abbeville, Ala., on Thursday morning. She was 97.

Recy Taylor, Anti Rape, African American Activist, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMN



Taylor’s death was confirmed by her younger brother, 81-year-old Robert Lee Corbitt, according to The Undefeated.

In addition to being a central figure in At the Dark End of the Street, Taylor was the subject of a documentary released earlier this month called The Rape of Recy Taylor, which focuses on the use of white sexual terror against black women during the Jim Crow era.

The racially motivated rape of black women by white men was as prominent during Jim Crow as the lynching of black men was, but it is a topic that is not as discussed. Sexual violence against black women often goes overlooked.

Recy Taylor, Anti Rape, African American Activist, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMN

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NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY & CULTURE | WASHINGTON, DC

The National Museum of African American History and Culture is the only national museum devoted exclusively to the documentation of African American life, history, and culture. It was established by Act of Congress in 2003, following decades of efforts to promote and highlight the contributions of African Americans. To date, the Museum has collected more than 36,000 artifacts and nearly 100,000 individuals have become charter members. The Museum opened to the public on September 24, 2016, as the 19th and newest museum of the Smithsonian Institution. (Website).


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