Al Jarreau — The acclaimed jazz vocalist, who boasted a 42-year career in the music industry, died Feb. 12 at age 76.

Clyde Stubblefield — The revered drummer, best known for his work with James Brown and his ubiquitous solo on Brown’s “Funky Drummer,” died Feb. 18 of kidney failure at age 73.

Leon Ware — The singer-songwriter and composer, best known for his production work with Marvin Gaye, Quincy Jones, Michael Jackson, Minnie Riperton and Maxwell, died Feb. 23 of prostate cancer at age 77.

Joni Sledge — The singer and member of Sister Sledge, best known for their hit “We Are Family,” died on March 11 at 60 of natural causes.

Chuck Berry – The rock ‘n’ roll icon, who inspired a generation of musicians with his indelible guitar licks, brash self-confidence and memorable songs about cars, girls and wild dance, died March 18 at his home near Wentzville, Mo., at age 90.

Charlie Murphy — The older brother of famed comedian Eddie Murphy and accomplished comedian in his own right, best remembered for the Comedy Central sketch-comedy series “Chappelle’s Show,” died April 12 at the age of 57 after battling blood cancer.

Cuba Gooding Sr. — The legendary lead singer of soul group The Main Ingredient and father of actor Cuba Gooding Jr. was found dead of natural causes in his car on April 20 at age 72.

Ugo Ehiogu — The former England and Aston Villa defender died after collapsing at a training center on April 21 at age 44.

African American History, Black History, African Americans Lost 2017, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMN

African American History, Black History, African Americans Lost 2017, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMN

African American History, Black History, African Americans Lost 2017, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMN

African American History, Black History, African Americans Lost 2017, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMN


NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY & CULTURE | WASHINGTON, DC

The National Museum of African American History and Culture is the only national museum devoted exclusively to the documentation of African American life, history, and culture. It was established by Act of Congress in 2003, following decades of efforts to promote and highlight the contributions of African Americans. To date, the Museum has collected more than 36,000 artifacts and nearly 100,000 individuals have become charter members. The Museum opened to the public on September 24, 2016, as the 19th and newest museum of the Smithsonian Institution. (Website).


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KOLUMN Magazine celebrates the lives of People of Color by giving our world texture.