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Don Hogan Charles, Lauded Photographer of Civil Rights Era, Dies at 79 | The New York Times Don Hogan Charles, who was the first black photographer to be hired by The New York Times, and who drew acclaim for his evocative shots of the civil rights movement and everyday life in New York, died on Dec. 15 in East Harlem. He was 79.

Don Hogan Charles, African American Photographer, African American Photography, African American History, Black History, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMN



His niece Cherylann O’Garro, who announced the death, said his family did not yet know the cause.

In more than four decades at The Times, Mr. Charles photographed a wide range of subjects, from local hangouts to celebrities to fashion to the United Nations. But he may be best remembered for the work that earned him early acclaim: his photographs of key moments and figures of the civil rights era.

In 1964, he took a now-famous photograph, for Ebony magazine, of Malcolm X holding a rifle as he peered out of the window of his Queens home. In 1968, for The Times, he photographed Coretta Scott King, her gaze fixed in the distance, at the funeral of her husband, the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Don Hogan Charles, African American Photographer, African American Photography, African American History, Black History, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMNDon Hogan Charles/New York Times Co./Getty Images | Photo Credit

Don Hogan Charles, African American Photographer, African American Photography, African American History, Black History, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMNDon Hogan Charles/New York Times Co./Getty Images | Photo Credit

Don Hogan Charles, African American Photographer, African American Photography, African American History, Black History, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMNDon Hogan Charles/New York Times Co./Getty Images | Photo Credit

Don Hogan Charles, African American Photographer, African American Photography, African American History, Black History, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMNDon Hogan Charles/New York Times Co./Getty Images | Photo Credit

Don Hogan Charles, African American Photographer, African American Photography, African American History, Black History, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMNDon Hogan Charles/New York Times Co./Getty Images | Photo Credit


NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY & CULTURE | WASHINGTON, DC

The National Museum of African American History and Culture is the only national museum devoted exclusively to the documentation of African American life, history, and culture. It was established by Act of Congress in 2003, following decades of efforts to promote and highlight the contributions of African Americans. To date, the Museum has collected more than 36,000 artifacts and nearly 100,000 individuals have become charter members. The Museum opened to the public on September 24, 2016, as the 19th and newest museum of the Smithsonian Institution. (Website).


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KOLUMN Magazine celebrates the lives of People of Color by giving our world texture.

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