Late in the series She’s Gotta Have It, the 10-episode Netflix reboot of Spike Lee’s 1986 film, an unnamed vandal begins painting bright green letter Gs on to the million-dollar brownstones in the Brooklyn neighborhood of Fort Greene. The G, it is supposed, stands for “gentrification”, which is what makes the brownstones cost that much in the first place, and invites cartoonishly uptight white women, such as the character Bianca, who wakes up to find two such emblems spray-painted on her building, into the neighborhood.

In real-life Brooklyn, gentrification isn’t spelled out quite so plainly, and yet it is impossible to ignore. That’s how She’s Gotta Have It, the story of twentysomething artist Nola Darling, is also the story of Lee’s once vibrant community of artists turned impossible-to-afford haven for newcomers.

Like Sex & the City and Insecure, She’s Gotta Have It is the story of a particular woman in a particular place, where the place is as much of a character as the woman, and meant to be familiar to the viewers who live there. That’s part of the delight of watching She’s Gotta Have It: recognizing Greenlight Bookstore, the Brooklyn Heights Promenade, even a particular corner on Myrtle Avenue. What gentrification challenges is the opportunity to see yourself in your neighborhood –the people pushed out; the familiar storefronts replaced by endless cafes, cupcake shops and dog spas.

She's Gotta Have It, Spike Lee, Nola Darling, Mars Blackmon, Greer Childs, African American Cinema, African American Film, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMN

She's Gotta Have It, Spike Lee, Nola Darling, Mars Blackmon, Greer Childs, African American Cinema, African American Film, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMN

She's Gotta Have It, Spike Lee, Nola Darling, Mars Blackmon, Greer Childs, African American Cinema, African American Film, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMN


NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY & CULTURE | WASHINGTON, DC

The National Museum of African American History and Culture is the only national museum devoted exclusively to the documentation of African American life, history, and culture. It was established by Act of Congress in 2003, following decades of efforts to promote and highlight the contributions of African Americans. To date, the Museum has collected more than 36,000 artifacts and nearly 100,000 individuals have become charter members. The Museum opened to the public on September 24, 2016, as the 19th and newest museum of the Smithsonian Institution. (Website).


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KOLUMN Magazine celebrates the lives of People of Color by giving our world texture.