Lowell Hawthorne, Golden Crust, Caribbean Bakery Caribbean Entrepreneur, Suicide, Mental Health, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMN

Death of Jamaican Fast-Food Magnate Stuns Friends and Workers | The New York Times “Our hearts are broken, and we are struggling to process our grief over this tremendous loss,” the Golden Krust company said in a statement on Sunday. “Lowell was a visionary, entrepreneur, community champion, and above all a committed father, family man, friend and man of faith.”



Lowell Hawthorne used the flavors of his native Jamaica to build a fast-food empire from scratch in the United States. But after 28 years as the president and chief executive of Golden Krust Caribbean Bakery & Grill, Mr. Lowell fatally shot himself on Saturday, the police said.

The entrepreneur’s death sent shock waves through the Caribbean community in New York, where he was seen as an immigrant success story, and in Jamaica. And it stunned his family, friends and customers.

“Our hearts are broken, and we are struggling to process our grief over this tremendous loss,” the Golden Krust company said in a statement on Sunday. “Lowell was a visionary, entrepreneur, community champion, and above all a committed father, family man, friend and man of faith.”

The Bronx-based company, where Mr. Hawthorne had worked with his wife and four children, offered thanks to supporters, and said funeral arrangements would be announced at a later date.

Lowell Hawthorne, Golden Crust, Caribbean Bakery Caribbean Entrepreneur, Suicide, Mental Health, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMNRicky Flores/The (Westchester County, N.Y.) | Photo Credit

Lowell Hawthorne, Golden Crust, Caribbean Bakery Caribbean Entrepreneur, Suicide, Mental Health, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMNRicky Flores/The (Westchester County, N.Y.) | Photo Credit

Lowell Hawthorne, Golden Crust, Caribbean Bakery Caribbean Entrepreneur, Suicide, Mental Health, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMN


NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY & CULTURE | WASHINGTON, DC

The National Museum of African American History and Culture is the only national museum devoted exclusively to the documentation of African American life, history, and culture. It was established by Act of Congress in 2003, following decades of efforts to promote and highlight the contributions of African Americans. To date, the Museum has collected more than 36,000 artifacts and nearly 100,000 individuals have become charter members. The Museum opened to the public on September 24, 2016, as the 19th and newest museum of the Smithsonian Institution. (Website).