This past summer I shook hands with Detroit. Specifically, I signed up for Slow Roll, a mass social bike ride. Slow Roll (pronounced “Sloow Roooooooooll!”) was co-founded seven years ago by Jason Hall and Mike MacKool as a small, motley group of cyclists who bonded while riding motorless in the Motor City, evading the police and potholes and irate drivers. Over the years, Slow Roll has evolved and grown up alongside its hometown and now the Detroit police escort as many as 4,000 Slow Rollers on a weekly ride designed to highlight one of the city’s many historic neighborhoods.

Unfortunately, the Slow Roll I was supposed to take part in was canceled hours before its start because of a threatening thunderstorm. But, as the old saying goes, “80 percent of life is showing up.” So I showed up.

The Slow Roll gathering point, in front of the old Masonic Temple, was a ghost town. There was me, a young African-American man named Woody who had been Slow Rolling since the beginning (“Since before the beginning”) and three middle-aged white women who had come in from the suburbs. This was their first Slow Roll and they hadn’t heard the ride had been canceled.

“Don’t worry,” said Woody. “They’re coming.”

The women looked doubtful beneath their bicycle helmets. Not too long ago suburbanites rarely came downtown. I remember visiting Detroit in 2001 and being unnerved by how empty the streets were. It felt like the beginning of a zombie apocalypse movie. The national media participated in constructing this portrait of Detroit as the ultimate failed American city, artfully feeding the public’s appetite for ruin porn with photos of decaying buildings, majestic theaters crumbling into dust, trees sprouting through walls.

Detroit, Detroit Against Everybody, Shā La Cynt's Personal Chef & Catering, Q Line, Malik Yakini, Slow Roll Detroit, Detroit Vegan Soul, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMNCourtesy of Detroit Vegan Soul | Photo Credit

Detroit, Detroit Against Everybody, Shā La Cynt's Personal Chef & Catering, Q Line, Malik Yakini, Slow Roll Detroit, Detroit Vegan Soul, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMN

Detroit, Detroit Against Everybody, Shā La Cynt's Personal Chef & Catering, Q Line, Malik Yakini, Slow Roll Detroit, Detroit Vegan Soul, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMNCourtesy of Shā La Cynt’s Personal Chef & Catering, LLC | Photo Credit

Detroit, Detroit Against Everybody, Shā La Cynt's Personal Chef & Catering, Q Line, Malik Yakini, Slow Roll Detroit, Detroit Vegan Soul, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMNMalik Yakini | Exec Dir., Detroit Black Community Food Security Network


NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY & CULTURE | WASHINGTON, DC

The National Museum of African American History and Culture is the only national museum devoted exclusively to the documentation of African American life, history, and culture. It was established by Act of Congress in 2003, following decades of efforts to promote and highlight the contributions of African Americans. To date, the Museum has collected more than 36,000 artifacts and nearly 100,000 individuals have become charter members. The Museum opened to the public on September 24, 2016, as the 19th and newest museum of the Smithsonian Institution. (Website).


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KOLUMN Magazine celebrates the lives of People of Color by giving our world texture.