African American History, African American Families, African American News, Civil Rights, Activist, Racism, Lorraine and Eugene Williams, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMN

Lorraine and Eugene Williams: A civil rights power couple | The Daily Progress Lorraine and Eugene Williams, the Charlottesville couple whose civil rights work helped desegregate city schools and whose business focused on fair and affordable housing, are the recipients of the Charlottesville Regional Chamber of Commerce’s 2017 award for diversity.



The chamber’s John F. Bell Sr. Vanguard Award was created in 2015 to recognize those who actively promote diversity within the business community.

The award’s namesake was a respected business leader during the Jim Crow era when much of the South was legally segregated. Bell founded the J.F. Bell Funeral Home, which is still family-run.

The award will be presented Tuesday at the Chamber Business Diversity Luncheon, hosted by the Chamber Business Diversity Council. The sold-out luncheon is being held at the Jefferson School African American Heritage Center. Michel Zajur, founder and CEO of the Virginia Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, will be the keynote speaker.

African American History, African American Families, African American News, Civil Rights, Activist, Racism, Lorraine and Eugene Williams, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMNAndrew Shurtleff/The Daily Progress | Photo Credit

African American History, African American Families, African American News, Civil Rights, Activist, Racism, Lorraine and Eugene Williams, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMNAndrew Shurtleff/The Daily Progress | Photo Credit

African American History, African American Families, African American News, Civil Rights, Activist, Racism, Lorraine and Eugene Williams, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMNAndrew Shurtleff/The Daily Progress | Photo Credit


NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY & CULTURE | WASHINGTON, DC

The National Museum of African American History and Culture is the only national museum devoted exclusively to the documentation of African American life, history, and culture. It was established by Act of Congress in 2003, following decades of efforts to promote and highlight the contributions of African Americans. To date, the Museum has collected more than 36,000 artifacts and nearly 100,000 individuals have become charter members. The Museum opened to the public on September 24, 2016, as the 19th and newest museum of the Smithsonian Institution. (Website).