Louis T. Wright, African American Veterans, African American History, Black History, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMN

The overlooked story of 104 African American doctors who fought in World War I | The Washington Post By the time Louis T. Wright headed to France as an Army doctor, he was accustomed to discrimination — and accustomed to fighting it.



The son of a former slave, Wright struggled to receive a medical education on par with his white classmates at Harvard Medical School. He was one of 104 African American doctors who served the 40,000 black troops who saw combat during the war.

At home, segregation reigned. On the battlefield, men like Wright hoped they’d be viewed as skilled physicians and not racial inferiors.

On Tuesday at 6 p.m., W. Douglas Fisher and Joann Buckley will reflect on the service of these doctors at a free event at the National Museum of Health and Medicine in Silver Spring. Their book, “African American Doctors of World War I,” tracks the lives of the men who cared for the Army’s two black combat units.

Louis T. Wright, African American Veterans, African American History, Black History, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMN

Louis T. Wright, African American Veterans, African American History, Black History, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMN


NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY & CULTURE | WASHINGTON, DC

The National Museum of African American History and Culture is the only national museum devoted exclusively to the documentation of African American life, history, and culture. It was established by Act of Congress in 2003, following decades of efforts to promote and highlight the contributions of African Americans. To date, the Museum has collected more than 36,000 artifacts and nearly 100,000 individuals have become charter members. The Museum opened to the public on September 24, 2016, as the 19th and newest museum of the Smithsonian Institution. (Website).