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African-American Day Parade set for Sept. 17 | New York Amsterdam News

African-American Day Parade set for Sept. 17 | New York Amsterdam News Dubbed as the “Largest Black Parade in America,” the 48th Annual African-American Day Parade is set to take place Sunday, Sept. 17, at 1 p.m. in Harlem.



The parade starts at West 111th Street and Adam Clayton Powell Boulevard and continues to West 136th Street. Black dignitaries and celebrities along with kings and queens of Black organizations are being featured.

Floats and marching bands are coming from 12 states. This year’s parade will honor African-American health professionals. Grand marshals include Dr. Jeff Gardere, Dr. Carol Brown of Memorial Hospital, Dr. Rob Core of Kings County Hospital and Dr. Aletha Maybank of the New York City Department of Health.

African American History, Black History, African American Families, African American Culture, African American Day Parade, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMN

African American History, Black History, African American Families, African American Culture, African American Day Parade, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMN

African American History, Black History, African American Families, African American Culture, African American Day Parade, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMN

African American History, Black History, African American Families, African American Culture, African American Day Parade, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMN

African American History, Black History, African American Families, African American Culture, African American Day Parade, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMNJules Allen | Photo Credit

African American History, Black History, African American Families, African American Culture, African American Day Parade, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMN

See Also
Corona Virus, COVID, COVID-19, Racial Disparities, African American Health, Black Healthcare, African American Healthcare, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMN, KINDR'D Magazine, KINDR'D, Willoughby Avenue, Wriit,


ADAM CLAYTON POWELL JR. | BAPTIST PASTOR & AMERICAN POLITICIAN

Adam Clayton Powell Jr. (November 29, 1908 – April 4, 1972) was a Baptist pastor and an American politician, who represented Harlem, New York City, in the United States House of Representatives (1945–71). He was the first person of African-American descent to be elected from New York to Congress. Oscar Stanton De Priest of Illinois was the first black person to be elected to Congress in the 20th century; Powell was the fourth.

Re-elected for nearly three decades, Powell became a powerful national politician of the Democratic Party, and served as a national spokesman on civil rights and social issues. He also urged United States presidents to support emerging nations in Africa and Asia as they gained independence after colonialism.

In 1961, after 16 years in the House, Powell became chairman of the Education and Labor Committee, the most powerful position held by an African American in Congress. As Chairman, he supported the passage of important social and civil rights legislation under presidents John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson. Following allegations of corruption, in 1967 Powell was excluded from his seat by Democratic Representatives-elect of the 90th Congress, but he was re-elected and regained the seat in the 1969 United States Supreme Court ruling in Powell v. McCormack. He lost his seat in 1970 to Charles Rangel and retired from electoral politics. (Wikipedia).


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