David Benioff and DB Weiss, the creators of HBO’s Game of Thrones, are bringing a new series to the network that will offer an alternative take on the American civil war.

Confederate, depicting the events leading up to a third conflict between the north and south, will be written by the showrunners and take place in an alternative timeline in which the southern states have successfully seceded, “giving rise to a nation in which slavery remains legal and has evolved into a modern institution”.

A statement released by HBO read: “The story follows a broad swath of characters on both sides of the Mason-Dixon Demilitarized Zone – freedom fighters, slave hunters, politicians, abolitionists, journalists, the executives of a slave-holding conglomerate and the families of people in their thrall.”
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The American Civil War was fought in the United States from 1861 to 1865. After a long standing controversy over slavery and state’s rights, war broke out in April 1861, when Confederates attacked Fort Sumter in South Carolina, shortly after Abraham Lincoln was elected. The nationalists of the Union proclaimed loyalty to the U.S. Constitution. They faced secessionists of the Confederate States of America advocating states’ rights to perpetual slavery and its expansion in the Americas.

Among the 34 U.S. states in February 1861, seven Southern slave states individually declared their secession from the U.S. to form the Confederate States of America. The Confederacy grew to include eleven states; it claimed two more border states (Kentucky and Missouri), the Indian Territory, and the southern portions of the Union’s western territories of Arizona and New Mexico, which was organized and incorporated into the Confederacy as Confederate Arizona. The Confederacy was never diplomatically recognized by the United States government, nor was it recognized by any foreign country (although Britain and France granted it belligerent status). The states that remained loyal, including the border states where slavery was legal, were known as the Union or the North. (Wikipedia).


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