The black barbershop today is one of the only safe spaces for black Americans to beautify themselves and form community and discuss politics and the culture. A new exhibition, The Shop, curated by the artist, CRICE Khalil explores the politics of black hair and the barbershop/beauty salon through nine Minneapolis-based artists, including Noah Lawrence-Holder, Seitu Jones, Candice Davis, Ta–coumba T. Aiken, Emma Eubanks, Bobby Rogers, Keith Williams, and Malakai Davis-Greiner.

“The inspiration for this show came from my initial introduction into the art scene and finding it very homogeneous,” explains Khalil to Creators. He says, “The work in the show is centered around the culture and realities of being black in America and my goal was to really use the barbershop, which is almost a universally shared experience among black people, as a vehicle to express themes that are rarely discussed outside of that safe space let alone in an art gallery.”

Afropick | CRICE Khalil

Noah Lawrence-Holder, Seitu Jones, Candice Davis, Ta–coumba T. Aiken, Emma Eubanks, Bobby Rogers, Keith Williams, and Malakai Davis-Greiner, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMN, African American Communities, African American ArtThe Shop | Keith Williams

Noah Lawrence-Holder, Seitu Jones, Candice Davis, Ta–coumba T. Aiken, Emma Eubanks, Bobby Rogers, Keith Williams, and Malakai Davis-Greiner, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMN, African American Communities, African American ArtCatch a Fade | Bobby Rogers


Public Functionary (PF) is an art exhibition and social space in Northeast Minneapolis (opened in 2012). Our approach challenges past paradigms of gallery culture. Public Functionary invites a broader audience reflective of the creative diversity of the Twin Cities to feel welcome, engaged and connected. We work towards a new expression of access and community in a modern context.

In pursuit of this goal, PF focuses on creative risk taking, authentic audience engagement, collaborative power and presenting art experiences in an inclusive, immersive context. PF’s energy is not simply based on what hangs on the walls, but the people who activate and transform the space. On top of producing museum-quality exhibits, we continually open our doors to a highly diverse cross-section of both emerging and established creative producers. We act as a launch pad for them to explore possibilities through events, performances, installations and dialogue — often using our exhibits as a backdrop for these explorations. We provide a true voice for our community, allowing them the freedom of unfettered decision-making and creative empowerment. (Website).


Posted by:Editor

KOLUMN Magazine celebrates the lives of People of Color by giving our world texture.