Stacey Abrams, Georgia Politics, Georgia Governor, African American Politics, African American News, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMN

Meet the Democrat who wants to be America’s first black female governor – The Guardian Stacey Abrams, Georgia’s state house minority leader, hopes to make history – and her track record shows that pushing boundaries is what she does best

It’s hard enough to be running for governor as a Democrat in Georgia. It’s harder still to do it as an African American. But to do it as an African American woman is almost like trying to shoot the moon. That, however, is precisely what Stacey Abrams is preparing to do.

The Democratic leader in the state Capitol these last seven years, Abrams has long signaled her interest in running for the state’s highest office — and on Tuesday she finally filed paperwork, the first formal step in entering the race.

The contest to replace the outgoing Republican governor Nathan Deal is wide open. Three Republican candidates have already announced, but as a longtime Democratic leader in the statehouse (she was elected to the house in 2006 and became the minority party’s leader in 2011), as well as a rising star on the national stage, the move marks her as the highest profile Democrat in the field.

Stacey Abrams, Georgia Politics, Georgia Governor, African American Politics, African American News, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMN

Stacey Abrams, Georgia Politics, Georgia Governor, African American Politics, African American News, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMNPhoto | Melissa Golden

Stacey Abrams, Georgia Politics, Georgia Governor, African American Politics, African American News, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMN


The Governor of Georgia is the head of the executive branch of Georgia’s state government and the commander-in-chief of the state’s military forces. The governor also has a duty to enforce state laws; the power to either veto or approve bills passed by the Georgia Legislature; the power to convene the legislature; and the power to grant pardons, except in cases of treason and impeachment. Jimmy Carter, who held the office from 1971 to 1975, later went on to become the 39th President of the United States. (Wikipedia)