Bronzeville, Bronzeville Podcast, Larenz Tat, Lawrence Fishburne, African American Entertainment, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMN

Here’s Why The ‘Bronzeville’ Podcast Series Is A Must-Listen – Global Grind The all-star cast and historic setting make the audio drama a one-of-a-kind experience.

If you’re still sleeping on the podcast revolution, Bronzeville is a chance to catch up. It features elite actors and a riveting story based in 1940s Chicago.

Episode Two of Larenz Tate and Laurence Fishburne‘s audio drama premiered today on iTunes and Spotify (LISTEN HERE), so if you need something to listen to while you work out, clean up or just kill time, you would be wise to check it out.

The 10-part series takes you back in time to the South Side of Chicago, long before the President was threatening to invade with federal forces. In the 1940s, Bronzeville and other self-sufficient Black enclaves had thriving economies and vibrant cultures.

The neighborhood’s independence was built on a community-wide lottery, kept alive by numbers runners and local citizens, who you’ll meet throughout the series.

Bronzeville, Bronzeville Podcast, Larenz Tat, Lawrence Fishburne, African American Entertainment, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMN

Bronzeville, Bronzeville Podcast, Larenz Tat, Lawrence Fishburne, African American Entertainment, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMN

Bronzeville, Bronzeville Podcast, Larenz Tat, Lawrence Fishburne, African American Entertainment, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMN

Bronzeville, Bronzeville Podcast, Larenz Tat, Lawrence Fishburne, African American Entertainment, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMN

Bronzeville, Bronzeville Podcast, Larenz Tat, Lawrence Fishburne, African American Entertainment, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMN


Bronzeville is a neighborhood in the Douglas and Grand Boulevard community areas on the South Side of Chicago around the Illinois Institute of Technology, VanderCook College of Music, and Illinois College of Optometry. It is accessible via the Green and Red lines of the Chicago Transit Authority, as well as the Metra Electric District Main Line. In 2011 a new Metra station, Jones/Bronzeville Station, opened to serve the neighborhood on the Rock Island and planned SouthEast Service.

In the early 20th century, Bronzeville was known as the “Black Metropolis”, one of the nation’s most significant concentrations of African-American businesses. Between 1910 and 1920, during the peak of the “Great Migration”, the population of the area increased dramatically when thousands of African Americans escaped the oppression of the South and emigrated to Chicago in search of industrial jobs. The Wabash YMCA is considered the first African-American Y in the U.S. It continues as a center today due to the continued support of many of the black churches in the area. The Wabash YMCA is widely credited as the birthplace of the commemoration of black culture, what would later become Black History Month.

Noted people associated with the development of the area include: Andrew “Rube” Foster, founder of the Negro National Baseball League; Ida B. Wells, a civil rights activist, journalist and co-organizer of the NAACP; Margaret Taylor-Burroughs, artist, author, and one of the co-founders of the DuSable Museum of African American History; Bessie Coleman, the first African-American woman pilot; Gwendolyn Brooks, 1985 United States Poet Laureate, 1968 Poet Laureate of Illinois, and first African American awarded the Pulitzer Prize; actresses Marla Gibbs and Jennifer Beals; acclaimed R&B singers Sam Cooke and Lou Rawls; and cornet player and jazz bandleader King Oliver. His protégé, jazz musician, trumpeter and bandleader Louis Armstrong from New Orleans and his wife Lil Hardin Armstrong, who was a pianist, composer and bandleader, lived in Bronzeville on E. 44th Street and performed at many of the area’s night clubs, including the Sunset Cafe and Dreamland Cafe. The neighborhood includes the Chicago Landmark Black Metropolis-Bronzeville District. (Wikipedia)