As the links between Trump associates and Russian intelligence became clearer, and Russian influence on the U.S. election deemed more influential, administration officials worried that classified intelligence that would be vital to a future investigation could be easily destroyed or simply dismissed by the incoming Trump White House.

“At the Obama White House, Mr. Trump’s statements stoked fears among some that intelligence could be covered up or destroyed—or its sources exposed—once power changed hands,” the New York Times writes. “What followed was a push to preserve the intelligence that underscored the deep anxiety with which the White House and American intelligence agencies had come to view the threat from Moscow.”

Russia, Vladimir Putin, Donald Trump, Trump Corruption, Russian Hacking, Russian Espionage, Barack Obama, Donald Trump, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMN

Russia, Vladimir Putin, Donald Trump, Trump Corruption, Russian Hacking, Russian Espionage, Barack Obama, Donald Trump, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMNPresident Obama and President-elect Donald J. Trump met in the Oval Office on Thursday. | Credit Stephen Crowley/The New York Times

Russia, Vladimir Putin, Donald Trump, Trump Corruption, Russian Hacking, Russian Espionage, Barack Obama, Donald Trump, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMNPresident Donald Trump points at Former President Barack Obama after his speech during the 58th Presidential Inauguration at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, Friday, Jan. 20, 2017. | AP Photo/Andrew Harnik



Partners In Health (PIH) is a Boston, Massachusetts-based non-profit health care organization founded by Paul Farmer, Ophelia Dahl, Thomas J. White, Todd McCormack, and Jim Yong Kim in 1987.

The goals of the organization are “to bring the benefits of modern medical science to those most in need of them and to serve as an antidote to despair.” It provides healthcare in the poorest areas of developing countries. It builds hospitals and other medical facilities, hires and trains local staff, and delivers a range of healthcare, from in-home consultations to cancer treatments. It also removes barriers to maintaining good health, such as dirty water or a lack of food, and strengthens the rights of the poor. The approach trades charity for “accompaniment,” which is described as a “dogged commitment to doing whatever it takes to give the poor a fair shake.” While many of its principles are rooted in Liberation theology, the organization is secular. It forms long-term partnerships with, and works on behalf of, local ministries of health.

The organization is widely known from Tracy Kidder’s The New York Times bestselling book Mountains Beyond Mountains: The Quest of Dr. Paul Farmer, a Man Who Would Cure the World. The book details Farmer’s life and work with the organization. The title comes from a simplified translation of the Haitian phrase, deye mon, gen mon. (Wikipedia).


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KOLUMN Magazine celebrates the lives of People of Color by giving our world texture.