As far as simple statistical comparisons go, I can’t recall any representations of it as striking as this chart from a recent report by the left-wing think tank Demos and the Institute on Assets and Social Policy at Brandeis University. As it shows, the median white household headed by a high-school dropout is wealthier today than the median black household headed by someone who went to college. The latter category includes those who at least attended a two- or four-year college, but not graduate degree holders.

African American Wealth, African American Economics, Black Wealth, Black Economics, African American Education, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMN

That’s how much of a head start white Americans have. The median black American who pursues higher education is still poorer, judged by net worth, than a white person who never finished 12th grade.

African American Wealth, African American Economics, Black Wealth, Black Economics, African American Education, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMNPhoto | Untitled, Columbus, Ohio, 1950
Courtesy of and copyright The Gordon Parks Foundation

African American Wealth, African American Economics, Black Wealth, Black Economics, African American Education, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMNPhoto | Photograph by Gordon Parks. Courtesy and © The Gordon Parks Foundation

African American Wealth, African American Economics, Black Wealth, Black Economics, African American Education, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMNPhoto | Husband and Wife, Sunday morning, Detroit, Michigan,n 1950, Gordon Parks (American 1912-2006)

HISTORICALLY BLACK COLLEGES & UNIVERSITIES (HBCUs) | INSTITUTION OF HIGHER LEARNING

Historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) are institutions of higher education in the United States that were established before 1964 with the intention of primarily serving the African American community. They have always allowed admission to students of all races. Most were created in the aftermath of the American Civil War and are in the former slave states, although a few notable exceptions exist.

There are 107 HBCUs in the United States, including public and private institutions, community and four-year institutions, medical and law schools. (Wikipedia).

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