Three African American Civil War vets to be relocated, buried at Fort Indiantown Gap National Cemetery

Three Cumberland County men who died after serving our country were buried in the forgotten remnants of an overgrown cemetery, their stories lost in the woods and in the pages of history.


But next week, they will be getting the honor and recognition they deserve.

Three African-American Civil War veterans, who hail from Penn Township, will be buried at the Fort Indiantown Gap National Cemetery in a ceremony that’s open to the public at 1 p.m. Wednesday.

In addition to that ceremony, another service will be held earlier that day at 10:30 a.m. at their previous burial site. Those who want to attend should meet at the Penn Township Fire Station, 1750 Pine Road, Newville, to take a shuttle to the site.

Christopher Hoffman of Hoffman Funeral Home and Crematory said the three men – William Anderson, Greenburg Stanton and John Nelson — where all buried in the Williamson Cemetery in Huntsdale.



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