A Digital Archive Documents Two Decades of Torture by Chicago Police

BY   Juleka Lantigua-Williams    PUB   The Atlantic 

Amid continued accusations of police misconduct, the force must contend with a digital rehashing of a sordid chapter in its history.


The Chicago Police Department seems to be continuously embroiled these days in multiple, multiple, high-profile investigations of fatal incidents, corruption scandals, and mishandling of critical equipment. Now, the CPD will have to contend with an online, 10,000-document-strong archive of an even more troubling time in its history: the notorious two decades in which officers performed torture.

The Chicago Torture Archive will open this month at the University of Chicago. The massive collection comes from efforts by the People’s Law Office, a civil-rights organization, to gather interrogations, criminal-trial files, civil-litigation documents, works of journalism, and records of activism spurred by the CPD torture cases documented between 1972 and 1991.



Chicago Police Department
LAW ENFORCEMENT AGENCY, STATE OF ILLINOIS
The Chicago Police Department (CPD) is the law enforcement agency of the U.S. city of Chicago, Illinois, under the jurisdiction of the City Council. It is the second largest non-federal law enforcement agency in the United States behind the New York City Police Department. It has about 12,244 officers and over 1,925 other employees. Tracing its roots back to 1835, the Chicago Police Department is one of the oldest modern police forces in the world.


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