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Reparations Site Asks People to ‘Offset Your Privilege’ with Acts of Kindness


Reparations Site Asks People to ‘Offset Your Privilege’ with Acts of Kindness

BY   Nicky Woolf  |  PUBLICATION   The Guardian 

The project by a Seattle-based Artist lets strangers help a person of color with anything from Childcare to Taxes, and has attracted both praise and criticism.
Enne had no expectations when she posted her request for an engagement ring.

She had posted it to Reparations – a half art project, half social experiment, the idea of which is this: people of color can request help or services, and others (white people, other people of color, anyone) could offer help.

Posts on the site include offers of childcare, tarot reading and tax help. One reads: “Just want to chat over coffee or dinner, make a new friend, feel a little more connected, learn something new about someone you might not otherwise meet.”

“I want to marry this amazing woman,” Enne wrote. “I want to spend all the moments being her wife and partner in this life. But I cannot afford to get her a ring. I am struggling so hard to pay my part of the mortgage, and pay on a loan to rebuild my credit, as well as financial needs of my kids.



Natasha Marin
CREATIVE – POET & INTERDISCIPLINARY ARTIST
Natasha Marin is a poet and interdisciplinary artist. Her written work has been translated into several languages and has been showcased in exhibitions, performances and events around the world. She is a Cave Canem fellow and a Hedgebrook alum who has been published in periodicals like the Feminist Studies Journal, African American Review, and the Caribbean Writer. She received grants from the City of Austin, Artist Trust, and the City of Seattle for community projects involving text-based, visual, performance, and multimedia art.

The creative work I produce takes on many forms: poetry, video, sound, performance, and immersive and interactive installation. This multiplicity defines my work and functions like a native tongue. I use this language of multiplicity to communicate most profoundly who I am and what I believe about the world we are living in.

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