The Woodlands Texas, African American Stories, African American History, KOLUMN Magazine

Powerful Photos From One of Texas’ Most Historic Black Communities

Powerful Photos From One of Texas’ Most Historic Black Communities

photography MARTI CORN | text MARK MURRMANN | MOTHER JONES

“The land represents the blood, heart, and soul of our African American heritage.”

When photographer Marti Corn moved to The Woodlands, Texas, in 1996, she found herself living next to the subject of what would become her first book: the town of Tamina.



MARTI CORN
PHOTOGRAPHER – Environmental Portraiture
I tell the stories of those who have been mistreated, dismissed, and marginalized. As a documentary photographer I don’t conceptualize my images. I don’t plan how each portrait will be made. I simply listen to their stories, whatever they wish to share, and then through portraiture, and a gathering of their oral histories, allow them to reveal what they wish.
MORE | INFO



“Literally across the tracks” from The Woodlands, as Corn says, Tamina is a small community just north of Houston. Founded in 1871 by freed slaves, Tamina (originally known as Tammany) flourished for decades, benefiting from the logging industry and a railroad that ran from Houston to Conroe.

CONTINUE READING @ MOTHER JONES