African American Education, Integration, Brown v Board of Education, Supreme Court, KOLUMN Magazine

Why Did It Take So Long for Class-Based School Integration to Take Hold?

Why Did It Take So Long for Class-Based School Integration to Take Hold?

RICHARD D. KAHLENBERG | THE ATLANTIC

Half a century ago, the Coleman Report revealed that socioeconomic diversity is key to removing racial inequalities in education.

Fifty years ago—on July 2, 1966—the federal government published “Equality of Educational Opportunity,”a landmark study by the Johns Hopkins University sociologist James Coleman that gave support for a novel idea about education: that schools should integrate based on the socioeconomic status of students.

A dozen years earlier, the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in Brown v. Board of Education had famously declared that schools segregated by race were inherently unequal and ushered in decades of efforts to desegregate schools by race. But the Coleman Report, which Education Week said is “widely regarded as the most important education study of the 20th century,” put a twist on Brown.



BROWN v. BOARD of EDUCATION
U.S. SUPREME COURT CASE – 1954
Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, 347 U.S. 483 (1954), was a landmark United States Supreme Court case in which the Court declared state laws establishing separate public schools for black and white students to be unconstitutional. The decision overturned the Plessy v. Ferguson decision of 1896, which allowed state-sponsored segregation, insofar as it applied to public education. Handed down on May 17, 1954, the Warren Court’s unanimous (9–0) decision stated that “separate educational facilities are inherently unequal.” As a result, de jure racial segregation was ruled a violation of the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment of the United States Constitution. This ruling paved the way for integration and was a major victory of the Civil Rights Movement. However, the decision’s fourteen pages did not spell out any sort of method for ending racial segregation in schools, and the Court’s second decision in Brown II only ordered states to desegregate “with all deliberate speed”
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BAZEVIAN BAZEVIAN – French Artist
“The economy in dire straits, I started 3 years ago, a series of studies [Décrisation] based on the human condition, especially the face of homeless people. Face is meaning and language. It is obviously the location for the expressions and emotions which give information about the character. However, the face is the only part of the body normally exposed and naked. We can’t hide it in our society. So every day,when we look at faces, they told. Moreover, when we look at a face, we choose to accept the social conditions of this person. That’s why the portrait has a significant place in my work.”
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It found that if one’s goal were to raise the academic achievement of pupils, then promoting a socioeconomic mix of students was even more important than changing the racial composition of the school.

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